Art Review – Google’s wonderful tribute to Winsor McCay

Excerpt from Google’s ‘Little Nemo in Slumberland’ doodle

If, as is most likely, you use the Google search engine today, you’re in for  digital art treat. The Google doodle today celebrates the wonderful cartoonist Winsor McCay’s ‘Little Nemo in Slumberland’ – a cartoon strip first published in the 1900’s in the New York Herald.

The strip told the tale of a young boy, Little Nemo, as he tried to reach the Princess of Slumberland, travelling through strange and beautiful scenes in his surreal dreams.

This Google doodle is one of the best and most elaborate ones I have seen, and mimic’s brilliantly the original style and magic of McCay’s cartoon strip.

The interactive doodle allows you to tug at the corner of a curtain drape, and follow Little Nemo as he falls through a magical land, past the letters G-O-O-G-L-E, and concludes, as McCay often did, with Nemo being woken from his Slumberland adventure by falling from his bed.

McCay worked on many other cartoons, including animated films until his death in 1934. His art set the standard for the animated art of the era, inspiring, amongst many others, Walt Disney.

If you haven’t had the chance to check out Little Nemo, I would really recommend you do. The cartons are both complex and innocently simplistic, and are something really unique and wonderful, whether you’re a child or a grown up.

It’s really great the Google have chosen the 107th anniversary of Little Nemo as the inspiration for this doodle, and have put it together with such obvious care, understanding and respect for the artists work.

It is well worth taking a moment to take a look at it, and I hope it leads people to investigate further into the work of such a great artist.

The Original ‘Little Nemo’

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